DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.

I updated this electronic version of my Teaching Portfolio for my (successful! July 2017) application for Promotion to Full Professor at Georgetown University (September 2016), with additional updates in March 2017. I have maintained a formal Teaching Portfolio since 1995, when I created my first one (paper only). My first electronic portfolio was completed at Georgetown in 2004, when I was a Faculty Fellow at the Center for New Directions in Learning and Scholarship (CNDLS) - although I did not have formal teaching duties, or departmental support, to teach at GU - until the 2011-12 academic year; I have had very limited formal teaching responsibility at GU. The materials here represent work I have done almost entirely in my spare time, and the majority of my thinking about teaching and learning between 2005 and today was driven significantly by either my own educational experiences (completing my second PhD, from the College of Education Measurement, Statistics and Evaluation program at the University of Maryland, College Park (2006-2009)) or by my work on curriculum development and assessment. A small portion of this scholarship was funded by intramural grants. The Mastery Rubric (see Recent Scholarship of Teaching and Learning) was an idea I developed when I was supported by an NIH K30 grant (PI: Umans). My time on that grant as Director of Curriculum was covered 2005-6; the time was contributed "in kind" 2006-10. Since that early time on the Mastery Rubric (2005-6), I have published four (clinical research; ethical reasoning; evidence-based medicine; statistical literacy). Several other Mastery Rubric projects (one on advanced practice nursing in review as of April 2017; one on stewardship in preparation for submission 30 June 2017; and one on bioinformatics in preparation <early in prep April 2017>) are in progress.  I am also preparing to submit a piece outlining the Mastery Rubric construct and its validity evidence (July 2017). I plan to create a separate branch in this Portfolio for the Mastery Rubric alone, because it has shaped my thinking about teaching, learning, and their assessment very concretely.

 

 

The Mastery Rubric was a tool I created for curriculum development and evaluation that brings together cognitive science and psychology perspectives on expertise (for any domain) and how it differs from novice perspectives on the same information. These are united with educational science perspectives on clarity of objectives, and the alignment of teaching, learning, and assessment objectives. Together, the Mastery Rubric as a construct and tool represents my belief that students are collaborators and partners in education, not receptacles to be filled with 'knowledge'. My thinking about the importance of the Mastery Rubric for the learning enterprise was consolidated for a talk I gave at the Center for Teaching Excellence at the University of Hawai'i, Manoa in Honolulu, Hawai'i on 18 October 2013. This is the same slide deck I refer to as motivating my upcoming Teaching Philosophy Statement revision under that tab. In September, 2015 while in Glasgow, UK for a meeting, I gave a talk at the University of Glasgow School of Mathematics and Statistics that discusses the Mastery Rubric as a tool for supporting (and initiating) scholarship in teaching and learning. I gave this talk at Baylor University in October 2016 on metacognition and curriculum in higher education (which was posted later that day on my academia.edu site). The role of metacognition in a successful curriculum is an important aspect of the Mastery Rubric, and it also underpins my reasoning that students are partners, not receptacles, in their own education: developing their abilities to monitor their thinking and learning (and identifying when it isn't going as well as they hope) can make learning sustainable.

 

DRAFT: This module has unpublished changes.